Murder in the Library - Ōtāhuhu

6.15 for a 6.30pm panel discussion
Ōtāhuhu Library
28-30 Mason Ave
Ōtāhuhu, Auckland

The Ngaio Marsh Awards, in association with the New Zealand Book Council and Auckland Libraries, invite South Auckland booklovers to a free event featuring a diverse panel of four talented local crime writers.

Over the past century, crime writing has evolved from puzzle-like entertainment into modern novels delving deeply into people, places, and psychology. Still the world's most popular form of storytelling, crime fiction can take readers into all aspects of society, providing page-turning entertainment and memorable characters while also addressing real-life social issues.

2017 Ngaio Marsh Awards contenders Angus Gillies, Sidney Mazzi and Fiona Sussman are joined by Auckland-based international thriller writer Catherine Lea to talk about what inspired them to write tales full of crime, and how they create memorable characters and bring the world of their novels to vibrant life.

WHEN: Wednesday, 24 May 2017
WHERE: Otahuhu Library, 28-30 Mason Ave, Otahuhu, Auckland
WHEN: 6.15 for a 6.30pm panel discussion

This is a free event.

Angus Gillies' Ngati Dread trilogy, which examined a 1980s rastafarian uprising in Ruatoria, has been described as "one of the most remarkable books ever written about crime, race, religious voodoo, and the New Zealand way of life and death" (The Spinoff).

Catherine Lea worked in IT sales and recruitment, and writes international thrillers from her Auckland home. Her books have been translated into German, and praised as "thrillers with heart" and "absolutely spellbinding... completely unputdownable".

Sidney Mazzi is originally from Brazil and has worked in a variety of business roles in New Zealand. He now lives in Hamilton. His debut crime tale TAINTED BY FIRE has been described as "an exciting story that shows plenty of promise".

Fiona Sussman's THE LAST TIME WE SPOKE delves into the aftermath of a home invasion, and "shows the freshness and daring of Alan Duff's ONCE WERE WARRIORS" (Takahe) while being "a gripping story of grief and redemption" (Sunday Mirror).