Bannister, Bronwyn

Bannister, Bronwyn

Information

residence
Wellington

In Brief

Bronwyn Bannister is a Dunedin-born short story writer and novelist. Her first novel, Haunt, examined themes of isolation and repression against the background of 1920s New Zealand. Her short stories have appeared in Takahe and have been broadcast on National Radio. In 2000, Bannister was awarded the Creative New Zealand Louis Johnson New Writers' Bursary. She has also written features and book reviews for a number of publications.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Bannister, Bronwyn (–) is a Dunedin-born writer whose first novel, Haunt (2000), examines themes of isolation and repression against the background of 1920s New Zealand.

Irene and Margaret are both married to farmers in Seacliff, a small seaside settlement in Otago and the site of the notorious Seacliff psychiatric institution. Over forty years of friendship, the two womens lives become irrevocably intertwined, haunted as they are by the restrictions of a repressive society, the criminal neglect of a small child, and other less worldly phenomena.

Combining elements of mystery, fairy tale and ghost story, Haunt eventually unfolds its secrets to the reader. A reviewer writes in the NZ Listener '...there is nothing extraneous here; it might not be readily obvious why certain aspects are included but read on and all will be revealed - so neatly and so hauntingly.'

Bannisters short stories have appeared in Takahe and been broadcast on National Radio. She fits writing time around caring for her two children, to whom Haunt is dedicated.

In 2000 Bannister was awarded the Creative New Zealand Louis Johnson New Writers' Bursary. She has written features and book reviews for a number of publications including North and South, The Otago Daily Times, The Dominion Post, and Urbis.

In 2002 she had a short story included in Another 30 New Zealand Stories for Children, edited by Barbara Else. She is currently working on a book for children and her second novel.

Updated January 2017.