Huber, Raymond

Huber, Raymond

Information

Primary publisher
Walker Books, Australia
Rights enquiries
Jaclyn Prescott, Walker Books, email: marketingwba@walkerbooks.com.au
Publicity enquiries
Contact page at www.raymondhuber.co.nz

In Brief

Raymond Huber is a writer, editor and teacher. His junior novels Sting and Wings are told from a bee’s point of view, and his non-fiction picture book, Flight of the Honey Bee, is about honey bees. Kirkus Reviews said of the book, 'This handsome, respectful volume deserves a place on the shelf'. Huber has been involved in educational writing and he has written for the School Journal and for US schools. He is available to visit schools as part of the Writers in Schools programme and can lead Professional Development sessions for teachers.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Huber, Raymond (1958 - ) was born in Christchurch, and lives mainly in Dunedin. Huber has a Bachelor of Horticultural Science (1980), a Bachelor of Education (1991) and a Diploma in Children’s Literature (2001). He has been a community worker; a gardener; a primary school teacher; and has worked as a writer and editor since 2004.

Huber released In Motion and Technology Now, both published by Thomson Nelson in 2007, and he has written thirteen Primary School Textbooks for ESA Publications (2000-2008). He has written readers for US Core Literacy Programmes, and has had articles in the School Journal. He has had short fiction published in Hideous and Hilarious (Random House NZ, 2007) and Showtime (Random House NZ, 2008). He has a story in the Te Papa children's book, Curioseum (2014). Huber was the McGonagall poetry prize winner in 2005.

Walker Books, Australia, is Raymond Huber's main publisher. Sting (2009) was a finalist in the junior fiction category of the 2010 New Zealand Post Book Awards for Children. Sue Hoffart in North and South wrote that the book, ‘May be the first children’s novel from a bee’s point of view…adventure with a sense of humour and a serious eco message.’ Sharon Greenway reviewed the novel for Magpies, ‘It is because of his individualism that Ziggy becomes a hero and also finds his heart’s desire. A strong message that says it’s okay to be different.’ The author writes, ‘Sting brings together my love of children’s literature and science. I wanted to create an adventure with a small hero who saves the world. Honey bees proved perfect characters.’

Wings (2011) was a finalist Sir Julius Vogel Awards (Science Fiction and Fantasy). The Sydney Morning Herald review stated 'Huber creates courageous characters with whom readers will empathise instantly.' It was included in the NZ Listener's Top 50 books of the year: 'This bee’s-knees sequel is worth it just for the awareness it raises of the plight of the world’s bees.'

Flight of the Honey Bee (2013) is a hardback picture book published in the US, the Uk, Australia, Denmark and New Zealand. It is ‘lyrical non-fiction’, a mix of science and poetic story-form. The illustrations by Brian Lovelock also blend art and science, with accurate insects upon expressive backgrounds. Kirkus Reviews said, 'This handsome, respectful volume deserves a place on the shelf … it succeeds in accurately dramatizing honey bee behavior.' And Peta Andersen from Walker Books wrote, 'It’s rare to find a book which is so inextricably tied to events children can relate to while at the same time presenting a story so unlike theirs.'

Flight of the Honey Bee was a finalist in the Non-Fiction category of the 2014 New Zealand Post Book Awards for Children and Young Adults.

Raymond’s latest book is Peace Warriors (Mākaro Press, 2015) which tells the exciting stories of people who chose non-violent resistance in times of conflict. A war hero who refused to kill again; students who stood up to a dictator; a ship which sailed into a nuclear test zone; a whole village which used non-violence against the Nazis. These twenty stories from New Zealand and the world show that peaceful resistance and people power can be more effective than military force. David Hill describes it as ‘compelling and engrossing; the Otago Daily Times said it is 'Full of hope and notions of empowerment.’

MEDIA LINKS AND CLIPS

Updated January 2017.